Loew's Greeley Square, New York - May 10, 1926

Loew's Greeley Square Theatre program
LOEW'S WEEKLY
ISSUED FREE TO LOEW PATRONS
Vol. 7     NEW YORK, N.Y., OCTOBER 18, 1926 No. 34

Young Blood!  Young Love!  Young Ideas!
You'll stand up and cheer
BROWN OF HARVARD
The Greatest Football Picture Ever Made

EACH character in the picture is a character study in itself.  Brown, the part that William Haines portrays, is a typical, flippant, "wise-cracking" young student, conscious of his good looks -- thinks he knows women but is mentally clean and honest.

Doolittle, played by Jack Pickford, is the college goat, kicked about by all -- but he still admires his heroic college pals.

Mary Brian, the old-fashioned girl, lived near Harvard for years and understood every boy who tried to make love to her.  Around her revolves the intense rivalry of the students.

A REAL KICK IN EVERY REEL

A rollicking tale of modern college life, filmed in an elaborate manner, depicting the advantages and disadvantages of higher education, reproducing life on the campus with startling fidelity.  A picture with a tremendous popular appeal and has everything that goes for perfect fan entertainment.

On the stage, "BROWN OF HARVARD" enjoyed an enormous success, and we are proud to state that the screen version is far superior to the legitimate production.  Jack Conway, the director, took his entire company to Cambridge, Mass., to get authentic scenes of University life on the Harvard campus, including the stirring action of the Harvard-Yale football struggle of 1925 -- the exciting boat crew races -- it's a peep into the sensation-seeking lives of the modern youngster.

FOR ALL LOVERS OF 

- ROMANCE
- THRILLS
- SPORT
- COMEDY

PEP! POWER! PUNCH!

"BROWN OF HARVARD is the first film to catch the spirit of real college life -- there's a comedy kick to it -- mixed with clashing hearts that find their youthful fling in thrilling college sports that will make you stand up and cheer.

College graduates will be carried back to the years at school, while those who passed up college will learn for the first time the "ins and outs" of campus and dormitory activities.

Pictures like "BROWN OF HARVARD" are a credit to the screen!

DON'T FAIL TO SEE IT!

It's a picture that glorifies American college life.


Loew's Greeley Square program

 
LOEW'S WEEKLY
Published Weekly and Distributed Free to Our Patrons
Executive Offices
LOEW'S INC.
Loew's State Building
1540 Broadway, N.Y.C.

JOLLY CLAIRE

Claire Windsor, charming Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer player.

PAULINE STARKE IN NEW YORK

Pauline Stark is now in New York City after having completed her leading part with Antonio Moreno in Elinor Glyn's new film play, "Love's Blindness," which is being directed by John Frances Dillon for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.  Miss Starke will probably remain in town until Saturday, when she plans to return to the studios to begin work on another production.

Beginning Friday, May 14th, and every Friday evening thereafter
N.T.G.
Announcer of WHN Radio Station
Loew's State Theatre Bldg.
Broadway and 45th St.
and his radio enertainers will be at PALISADES PARK
in an impromptu revue in the Ballroom
Beginning Wednesday Evening, May 5th
CHARLESTON CONTEST 
and every Wed. thereafter

LOEW'S GREELEY SQ.
Theatre Open 11 A.M. to 11 P.M.
Telephone, Pennsylvania 1221

Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday
May 10-11-12

DOROTY REVIER & FORREST STANLEY
in
"THE FATE OF A FLIRT"

VAUDEVILLE ATTRACTIONS
Joe --     -- Kitty
CARSON & KANE REVUE
Present a Scenic Novelty in 
"Melody & Rhythm"
with Alma Brahan, Jack Barry and Rellà Kramer

MARDO & WYNN
"Bring 'Em Suit"

THE GREAT MAURICE
"The World's Greatest Card Manipulator"

Harry ---     ---- Dorothy
STANLEY & QUINETTE
Offer "Books"

Will H. ---     --- Sadye J.
FARREL & CHADWICK

JOHNNY CLARK & CO.

Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday
May 13-14-15-16

Rex Beach's Thrilling Novel
"THE BARRIER"
The greatest romance and adventure film of them all!
With Lionel Barrymore, Henry B. Walthall, Norman Kerry and Marceline Day
A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

VAUDEVILLE ATTRACTIONS

WILLIAM EBS
"Vaudeville's Newest Offering"

ARTHUR ASHLEY
in "Vaudeville" With Helen Clement

FOUR PEPPER SHAKERS
"Scott, Allan, Lee and Bo
Late of "Plantation Days"

FENNER & CHARLAND

Others

 
Drinking Water Used in This Theatre Filtered and Purified by Puro Health Filter

VAUDEVILLE VARIETIES on the Loew Circuit

DOLLY KRAMER, the knee-high prima donna, dancer and enterpreneur, heading her own midget jazz band of ten pieces in the Loew theatres, once had the honor and the fun of singing a duet with John McCormick.  It all happened in Dublin, when Dolly and her troupe of tiney syncopators werw playing in that city, and the great Irish tenor was just arriving from America.  McCormick, meeting the wee prima donna at a reception in his honor, lifted her onto one arm.  "What shall we sing?" he smiled.  "'Mighty Lak a Rose'," chirped Dolly. "All right, let's go!" replied the tenor, and he and little Miss Kramer, perched on his arm, sang a verse, to the great delight of the guests.

GENEVE BUTLER, who, with LEO FLANDERS, presents "The Composer and the Prima Donna" in the Loew Theatres, is the daughter of a Mississippi planter and a graduate of the Woman's College at Jackson, Miss.  Strange to say, her first professional engagement was as a soloist in a Jewish synagogue.  Miss Butler is able to negotiate high E flat with ease.  She sings operatized version of such oldtime favorites as "Suannee River" and "Old Black Joe."

FRED PISANO, who, with JACK LANDAUER, presents "Boom Boom" in the Loew theaters, hails from New Orleans, and he says he is contantly correcting the impression some people have that there is a strain of colored blood in the famous New Orleans Creole.  "The Creoles," announces Fred, "are of French and Spanish descent, and they are the proudest familits in the grand old city.  They've always been of the old aristocracy in New Orleans, the exclusive first-nighters of the Old French Opera.  However, I find less misinformation about the Creoles than in former years.  People everywhere are learning the truth about these splendid people."

REX BEACH'S GREATEST NOVEL -- "THE BARRIER" with
LIONEL BARRYMORE    NORMAN KERRY
HENRY B. WALTHALL    MARCELINE DAY

A Thrilling Scene in "The Barrier"

Loew's Greely Sq. Theatre -- May 13-14-15-16

WAVES PLAY HAVOC WITH FILM PLAYERS

Seasickness Incapacitates Cast of Rex Beach's "The Barrier"

SEASICKNESS raised havoc with production schedules when Director George Hill's company put out to sea on a sailing ship for the making of scenes for "The Barrier," the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer motion picture from Rex Beach's famous Alaskan story, which will be seen here part of next week.  Not one of the company escaped it, but some wonderful storm scenes were obtained nevertheless.

Norman Kerry, Henry B. Walthall, Lionel Barymore and Marceline Day, who hav the leading roles in this film, were all badly stricken and displayed considerable heroism in going through with their roles in spite of nausea and dizziness.  The story is brimful of thrills and action, and deals with early days in Alaska.

SHANNON & MARCELINE DAY ARE NOT RELATED

Shannon Day and Marceline Day, who play respectively the roles of mother and daughter in "The Barrier," the Metro=Goldwyn-Mayer photoplay of the Rex Beach novel, are not related, as the similarity of their names and their roles might lead one to believe.

Marceline Day is a newcomer to feature length pictures, having been chosen for the role of Necia, the heroine of the beach story, while playing incomedies and westerns.

FORREST STANLEY AT LIST SMILES IN PICTURE

Loew's Greele Sq. Theatre, May 10-11-12

Forrest Stanley, the handsome but stern young leading man of the screen, has smiled at last.  Girls have thrilled as the piercing glance that Mr. Stanley shoots out to the audience from between frowning brows.  But now they have a chance to see him smiling and happy.

According to pre-view notice the miracle takes place in "The Fate of a Flirt," which is coming here part of next week.  Playing opposite Mr. Stanley is the lovely young star, Dorothy Revier.  No wonder! If she put her arms around a wooden Indian and kissed it, the darn thing would probably not only smile, but jump for joy!  So there's a reason and a good one for Mr. Stanley's new face.

NORMA SHEARER IN "THE DEVIL'S CIRCUS" COMING

Probably the widest range of characterizations and emotional interpretation ever afforded Norma Shearer is seen in "The Devil's Circus," a Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer picture, whic is a coming attraction.  "The Devil's Circus" is the first American production of the Danish director, Benjamin Christianson.

In this opus Miss Shearer is first presented as a girl on the brink of womanhood, just out of an orphan asylum, a shabby, shy, forlorn little creature, her only friend in the world her nondescript dog.  Then she is a circus girl, a trapeze performer, clad in tights and spangles, tinseled ballet skirts and ornate wraps. Here she is a woman of the world, sidillusioned, despairing.


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Last Modified January 7, 2007