Loew's Greeley Square, New York - October 18th, 1926

Loew's Greeley Square Theatre program
LOEW'S WEEKLY
ISSUED FREE TO LOEW PATRONS
Vol. 8     NEW YORK, N.Y., OCTOBER 18, 1926 No. 5

OWEN MOORE WITH JOAN CRAWFORD

Leads in "The Taxi Dancer"

Owen Moore, featured player in many Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer pictures, is to have the leading male role in "The Taxi Dancer."  Joan Crawford has the featured feminine role in this new picture which is to be directed by Harry millarde. "The Taxi Dancer" is from the newspaper serial by Rober Perry Shannon.

Moore recently returned to the studios from New York where he enjoyed a vacation after working in Marion Davies' Cosmopolitan starring film, "The Red Mill."  This film is an adaption by Frances Marion of the famous operetta by Victor Herbert and Henry Blossom.

A HIGHLAND LASSIE!

Lillian Gish is said to give the finest performance of her career in the title role of "Annie Laurie" which John S. Robertson is directing for Metro_Goldwyn-Mayer.

ESTHER RALSTON

Who is on her way to Hollywood to appear in her first starring role n "Fashions for Women".

JOHN GILBERT'S "COCK O' THE WALK"

John Gilbert's next starring vehicle, to be known as "Cock O' the Walk," is scheduled to go into production early next week at the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios. This is a vivid drama with a Budapest background, adapted from Charles Renny Jackson's "The Day of Souls," and will be directed by Tod Browning, whose collaboration with Lon Chaney has earned for him a great reputation as a director of action and mystery stories.  "Cock O' the Walk" was scenarized by Waldemar Young.  Gilbert is now completing his role in "Flesh and the Devil," in which Great Garbo has the feminine lead.  Note: The final title of this film was The Show (1927).

MARINES IN CHANEY'S NEXT, WILD WITH JOY

Tunney's victory Cause for Outburst

Several hundred United States Marines, almost wild with joy, nearly wrecked the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios when the announcement arrived, via radio, of the victory of Gene Tunney over Jack Dempsey.

The feat of the ex-Marine was recieved by a big loud speaking unit installed by the studio for its employees.  Most eager of these were the Marines appearing in George Hill's "Tell It To The Marines," starring Lon Chaney, a detachment from the San Diego base loaned by the government.

The spirit of the corps resulted in the soldiers of the sea wagering everthing they had including their pay for weeks in advance, on Tunney, one of their vetrans.  According to Hill, if Dempsey had won, the Marines would have "lost their shirts."

$1,000 REWARD

For the arrest and conviction of Dan Mason, escaped convict, according to the story "The Understand Heart" by Peter B. Kyne in which Rockliffe Fellowes, pictured above, plays the role of the villain.


Loew's Greeley Square program

 
LOEW'S WEEKLY
Published Weekly and Distributed Free to Our Patrons
Executive Offices
LOEW'S INC.
Loew's State Building
1540 Broadway, N.Y.C.

 
LOEW'S GREELEY SQ.
6th Avenue and 30th Street
Theatre Open 11 A.M. to 11 P.M.
Sundays 2 P.M. to 11 P.M.
Telephone, Pennsylvania 1221

 
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday
October 18-19-20

"WAR PAINT"
with TIM McCOY
A Western story that is "different." From the pen of Peter B. Kyne.

VAUDEVILLE ATTRACTIONS
MUSICLAND
A Novel Melange of Harmony and Syncopation

MAY USHER
"Lyrics of Life"

SHARON STEPHENS & CO.
with Ruth Chorpenning & Mabel Mignon in "They Never Change"
A Funny Domestic Comedy

Geo. ---     ---- Alice
BROOKS & NACE
in "Excuse Me"

Cleverest Yet!
FRANK WHITMAN
"The Fiddler of Infinite Surprises"

Norine ----     ---- Joe
LORETTA & BALTUS
"Sensational Capers"

Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday
October 21-22-23-24

A comedy of an unusual sort
"YOU'D BE SURPRISED"
starring RAYMOND GRIFFITH
Supported by an exceptional cast

VAUDEVILLE ATTRACTIONS

JIMMY RYAN & CO.
in "Ten Dollars"

"BASCOP"
Singing, Whistling & Talking
By Geo. LeMaire & Ben Bernie

LAURIE & RAYNE

THE EARLS

Others

 
Drinking Water Used in This Theatre Filtered and Purified by Puro Health Filter

VAUDEVILLE VARIETIES on the Loew Circuit

PISANO & LANDAUER
When Fred Pisano of Pisano and Landauer, musical funmakers presenting "Boom Boom" in the Loew's Theaters, was a boy in Italy, he was a choir singer.  Later in New York, he became "The Inimitable Boy Soprano," making his bow as such at Proctor's 23rd Street.  Figuring his billing needed rougher phraseology he changed it to "The Terrible Wop."  When he began to get letters challenging him to wrestling bouts and a few hard managers agreed with his billing in regard to the "terrible," he became just "The Wop."  But, nowadays that's out.  It's Pisano and Landauer in "Boom Boom."  Such is Pisano's progress.

"WATCH YOUR STEP"

On the Loew Circuit, Hap hazards, presenting his comedy novelty act, "Watch Your step," uses twenty feet of cable, which was taken from the ill fated dirigible, The Shenandoah.  The cable was given Hap Hazards, whose real name is Hal Hart, at Lakehurst.  He was a naval flier during the war, and a fall of 1000 feet at Brest put him in the hospital 7 months, on the reserve list and back into vaudeville!

YVONNE

Yvonne, the versatile little dancer, violinist and aerialist, playing the Loew theaters, was formerly a member of the Ruth St. Denis and Theodore Kosloff ballets.  Later, she ran a dancing studio in San Francisco, but business held no charms.  She picked up aerial proficiency in a gymnasium and she had always played the violin.  So, she combined these accomplishments with her dancing and essayed vaudeville.  And there you are.

DIXIELAND GIRLS

Helen Lewis, who hads her Dixieland Girls in the Loew theaters, make some claims.  She says hers is the only girl band with a drumming prima donna -- herself; the only band carrying its own arranger and coach -- a man; the only girl band boasting a composer directing her own number -- herself, and the only girl band with every member a college or conservatory graduate.  These are some "only's" we'll hae to admit.

TIM McCOY, NEW WESTERN STAR, COMING IN "WAR PAINT"

LOEW'S GREELEY, OCTOBER 18-19-20

Acting in Films Give McCoy Genuine Thrills

Star Shot Twice, Kicked by Horse, Received Cuts and "Burn."

THOUGHT ACTING TAME

Now Finds Life on His Ranch in Wyoming Among Indians Tame in Comparison

The thrills of ranching in the Indian country of Wyoming are tame compared with the thrills of picture making.  This is the conclusion of Tim McCoy, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's new western star of "War Paint" coming here next week.  During the making of his initial starring picture, McCoy was shot twice, cut three times with a hunting knife, kicked in the back by a horse and had the flesh "burned" from his left hand when hangin on to a lariat by which a runaway horse was dragging him.

Fortunately none of his injuries were serious.  "I thought I had led something of a thrilling life," says McCoy, who was the youngest colonel in the United States Army and who is still a brigadier general of Wyoming State Milita.  "I lived among the Indians for years, served in the regular army, and ranched throughout the West, but I never had anything happen as thrilling as I have encountered during the few months I have been in pictures."

McCoy, said to be the greatest living authority on the North American Indian, has lived with them for years, and "speaks" their universal sign language, and it was through his influence with the Indians on the Wind River reservation that several hundred Arapahos and Shoshones were obtained to appear in "War Paint."

"YOU'D BE SURPRISED" AT RAY'S ARRAY OF PLAYERS

"You'd Be Surprised" at the case Raymond Griffith has assembled for his latest picture, the title of which is quoted above.

"You'd Be Surprised," coming her part of next week, has Raymond Griffith as its star.  But for his leading lady has has none other than Dorothy Sebastian, the brunette beauty who swept the picture-going public off its feet in "Sackcloth and Scarlet."

And then there's Earle Williams, who needs no introduction.  He has animportant role, as has Edward Martindel, another favorite.

Griffith is one actor who believes in the best.  He believes that good players deserve their chance, and are appreciated by the public, regardless of who the star may be.

Incidentally, "You'd Be Surprised," Griffith's funniest picture, is also a thriller of no small magnitude.  In fact, so baffling is the plot that Griffith has made a special request of audiences who see it not to tell the ending to their friends.

RAYMOND GRIFFITH

High hat comedian coming next week in "YOU'D BE SURPRISED."


More Information on the Loew's New Rochelle Theatre...

The Loew's Greeley Square Theatre at CinemaTreasures.com

More photos from Annie Laurie

More photos from Tell It To the Marines

More photos from You'd Be Surprised


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Last Modified December 20, 2007