Roxy Theatre, New York City, New York - July 11, 1930

Roxy Theatre program
A Magazine to Take Home

ROXY THEATRE

S. L. Rothafel "ROXY" Director
WEEKLY REVIEW

THE CATHEDRAL OF THE MOTION PICTURE


Roxy Theatre program

 
ROXY THEATRE
WEEKLY REVIEW
Official Magazine For Roxy Theatre Patrons

CIRCULATION 100,000 WEEKLY

Williams-Wiley Publications, Inc., 254 W. 54th St., N.Y. Phone Columbus 4425
Vol. VII -- No. 19     Subscription $3.00 a Year; $1.50 Six Months     July 11, 1930

COMING!

EDMUND LOWE and MARGUERITE CHURCHILL in "GOOD INTENTIONS"
Sensational Fox Movietone Drama


Roxy Theatre program

SUPPLYING THE ROXY
By Bee Richland

LIGHT has come to be an integral part of our stage entertainment. It's a medium to which S.L. Rothafel, "Roxy," has devoted immeasurable study and experimentation over a period of years. Its shading, its nuances, its expressionof moods and atmosphere change from phase to phase imperceptibly by meeans of the highly developed lighting syste and mechanical equipment of the theatre.

The spectator is conscious only of the beauty of the effects. He does not realize the operation, the maintenance, the machinery that is constantly in motion to create for him the ultimate effect of artistic perfection.

There are more than 75,000 electric lamps in constant use every day of every week at the Roxy. They range from the small 10-watt lamps which light up the exit signs, to the giant 2000-watt lamps which light up the performers on the stage.

Between these two extremes are myriads of 25, 40, 50, 60, 100, 200 and 1500-watt lamps used for every purpose that requires illumination. It takes a staff of more than 50 workers to maintain this department in efficient working order.

The policy, innovated by S.L. Rothafel, "Roxy," to provide the light in the auditorium by which, toe audience may refer to its progams, is responsible for a large quantity of the electrix lamps used.

This lighting, in addition to the lighting in the stairways, the Rotunda and the Lobby of the theatre, utilizes more than 30,000 lamps. The marguee, constantly lighted during all the hours that the theatre is open, uses an additional 4,500. Although most of them are of the clear variety, the colors of many of them range through blue, straw, amber, old rose, red and green.

The stage of the Roxy requires electric lights of greater magnitude. Of the 3,000 lamps used for productions, the majority are 300-watt. A great number of them are 200-watt. At least 120 of the lamps consist of the 1,500 and 2,000-watt sizes. In addition to these there are 45 arc-lamps, with capacities varying from 50 to 125 amperes.

The use of so great a number of electric lamps requires a carefully planned system of supply.

It is significant of the perpetual inspecion that is excercised, not only by the electrical and maintenance staffs of the theatre, but by Uniformed staff as well, that not one of the 75,000 lights in the theatre has ever been out for more than three minutes.

The reserve of the 15,000 lamps is constantly kept on hand to be pressed into service at a moment's notice. They represent each size, style and color, used in every part of the house. Bernard P. Arons, "Production quartermaster," is charged with the duty of keeping a daily inventory of this reserve.

In addition to regulating the lamp supply, Arons is the direct recipient of every article that comes into the Roxy. He receives and distributes all merchandise for the electrical, engineering, carpenter, cleaning, administrative, tailoring, hospital, art and music departments.

The rapid consumption of carbons alone requires a reserve supply of 5,000. The average life of a pair of carbons in an arc-lamp is a little less than an hour. The 45 arc-lights user up over 2,700 separate carbons weekly. The seven projection machines in the projection booth require an additional 1,200 carbons.

The quantity of separate items received by Arons and distributed to the various departments, averages about three hundres a week and often runs as high as five hundred. They vary from a projection machine or a thousand lamps to a new cyclorama for the stage.

This is not the only department of the Roxy which deals in bulk and quantity. The record os other departments in the huge organization reveal equally interesting statistics of staggering proportions. Perhaps one of the most colorful of these is the costuming department under the direction of Harriet Rogge. Each week it receives for its use, more than 2,000 yards of cloth that ranges from silk and velvet to cotton and sateen. In addition there is more than 5,000 yards of tape consumed.

The average number of shoes required at the Roxy each week is over 500 pairs. The monthly supply of shoes on the stage reaches the colossal figure of 2,000 pairs, which include some of the most elaborate productions to be presented a the Roxy Theatre, show a total of over 13,000 pairs.


Roxy Theatre program

Edmund Lowe in "Good Intentions"
By ESTHER KLEIN

WALKING the straight and narrow is no easy task when the sombre ghosts of an evil past cast their shadows ahead. The vivid, gripping story of a man who rose by sheer strength of will from theslums, who lawlwss as his environment, yet moulded himself a career of wealth and power -- only to find, when romance first backoned, that all of his money and power could not avoid the clutching fingers of the past that relentlessly reached forth and seized him, is part of the picture, "Good Intentions," with Edmund Lowe and Marguerite Churchill in the leading roles.

Edmund Lowe, who plays the part of a gang leader, has achieved the reputation of being one of the best portrayers of hard-boiled parts on the silver sheet. In face he prefers roles with some degree of toughness to those of the conventional leading man, and many times refused flattering offers from film companies because the role was too gentlemanly.

His latest offering for Fox Movietone, "Good Intentions" may at first seem to disprove this assertion, since the player is reavealed as a man of wealth, fashio and ease. This is the view the heroine takes of him, but when his real identity as the tricky leader of a band of international crooks is disclosed things begin to happen, especially when he tries to abandon his past and finds it can not be done.

"Hard boiled roles are bot the easists and most effective," says Edmund Lowe. "While I have enacted almost every conceivable type of part during my stage and screen career, I greatly prefer playing the tough guy. Most people have a streak of obstinacy or tgemper or vanity in their makeup, and the 99 and 44/100 pure hero seldom exists in real life. As a conseuence, (sic) it is much easier for an actor to impersonat a real-life character and make him convincing, with his various faults and idiosyncracies, than to portray the gentlemanly, colorless hero of old-style fiction and drama."

Quite recently Lowe was asked for a recipe for becoming a film celbrity. Though
(continued on page 6)

UP OR DOWN BROADWAY BEFORE OR AFTER THEATRE
DANCING DINING     NO COVER CHARGE AT ANY TIME

49TH STREET at B'WAY     44TH STREET at B'WAY

CHIN LEE     CHIN'S

LUNCH -- 55c     DINNER -- $1.25
A LA CARTE AT ALL HOURS

Lack. 3680     Bryant 2364

REVUE
DAILY MATINEE     TWICE NIGHTLY

Feature Acts This Week
ERNIE & BILLIE LEGER
"Versatile Dance Artists"

HENRI & BERYL
"Sensational Whirlwind Dancers"
Gene Cirina -- ORCHESTRAS -- Ernie Franz


Roxy Theatre program

EDMUND LOWE IN "GOOD INTENTIONS"
(Continued from page 3)

he did not guarantee results, this was his suggestion:

"Go to Santa Clara University, become captain of the baseball team, take your B.A degree at eighteen, join the university faculty a year later, and spend the following seven years on the stage," was his answer. This system certainly worked in his case.

Marguerite Churchill who plays the feminine lead in the picture isn't old enough to vote. She entered the Theatre Guild's Dramatic School when only fourteen years old and won two scholarships the first year. The next season she made her stage debut as an ingenue. For two successive years she was the youngest leading lady on Broadway and scored in six well known productions. And still she is only twenty.

These are a few of the outstanding highlights of her meteoric career, which in the opinion of screen experts, will lead her to the very front rank of film luminaries within a very short time.

This youthful genius is blessed withn -- to use the plebian term "it."

A picture with a "theme song" that is not sung by any of the stellar characters is one of the many unique features of "Good Intentions."

"Good Intentions" is one of the first pictures of the underworld to bring out the ironyof a crook's existence. The story is woven about the attempted reformation of Lowe and his butler, played by Henry Kolker who tries to guide his superior by astrological predictions.

Marguerity Churchill, Regis Toomey, Earle Foxe, Eddie Gribbon, Owen Davis, Jr., Pat Somerset, J. Carroll naish, Robert McWade, Hale Hamilton and other celbrities are in the case of this unusual offering. William K. Howard, who made such noteworthy films as "The Valiant," "Christina," "White Gold" and "Love, Live and Laugh," both wrote and directed the picture with George Manker Waters doing the screen play and dialogue.

HYDRIATIC BATHS
HOTEL ASTOR, TIMES SQUARE

Scotch Douche, Electric Light, Nauheim Baths, Colonic Irrigation, Scientific massage, Violet Rays, Men and Women
H. SPECK
Reg. Physiotherapist
Lackawanna 6834

FASHION MODELS
Become a Fashion Model
Only Ten Lessons; Day or Evening
Start Now with Busy Season! Call, Write, Phone Free Booklet

Fifth Avenue Studios, Inc.
30 W. 51st St., N.Y.
Volunteer 6031


Roxy Theatre program

FIRE NOTICE -- Look around NOW and choose the nearest Exit to your seat. In case of fire, walk, (not run) to THAT Exit. Do not try to beat your neighbor to the street. -- JOHN J. DORMAN, Fire Commissioner.

ROXY THEATRE

50th Street and 7th Avenue
Telephone, Circle 6000

Personal Direction of S. L. Rothafel, "Roxy" Under Whose Supervision the Programs Are Conceived, Staged and Lighted

PROGRAM

Week Beginning Friday, July 11, 1930
De Luxe Performances Approximately at 2:00; 4:00; 7:30; 9:30 -- Midnight Performance Nightly

1. THE ROXY ORGAN (Kimball)
Organists: Lew White and C. A. J. Parmentier

2. "THE ENCHANTED LAKE"
(Special Arrangement of Tschaikowsky Music by maurice Baron)

THE ROXY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Conductors: Joseph Littau
Maurice Baron     Mischa Violin
Concertmaster: Josef Stopak

HARRIET HOCTOR
Rheta Stone -- Irma Philbin
George Kiddon, George Kunowitch, Val Gueral
Jack Quinn and Constant Nickoll
The Roxy Bellet Corps
The Thirty-Two Roxyettes
RUSSEL E. MARKERT, Director
(Feathers by Henry Sittenberg & Son)

3. FOX MOVIETONE & HEARST METROTONE NEWSREEL
News of the World with Sound Reproduction

ROBERT
MAKES YOU BEAUTIFUL
675 FIFTH AVENUE (Nr. 53rd St.)

Plaza 9023-4-5-6
Write for Booklet.

Posed by Miss J. Ellis     Dorothy Mackaill First National Pictures


Roxy Theatre program

PROGRAM
(Continued)

4. PROLOGUE:
(After the Famous Painting "The Zaporogues" by Repine)
George Abagoff
Nicholas Vasilieff
The Russian Cathedral Choir
The Roxy Male Chorus

5.
LAWRENCE TIBBETT
IN
"THE ROGUE SONG"

Directed by Lionel Barrymore
Music by Franz Lehar and Herbert Stothart
A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Picture

THE CAST

YEGOR

Lawrence Tibbett

PRINCESS VERA

Catherine Dale Owen

PRINCESS ALEXANDRA

Nance O'NEIL

COUNTESS TATIANA

Judith Vosselli

PRINCE SERGE

Ullrich Haupt

YEGOR'S MOTHER

Elsa Alsen

NADJA

Florence Lake

OSSMAN

Lionel Belmore

HASSAN

Wallace MacDonald

PETROVNA

Kate Price

PROLOV

H. A. Morgan

COUNT PETER

Burr MacIntosh

AZMAT

James Bradbury, Jr.

ALI-BAK

Stan Laurel

MURZA-BAK

Oliver Hardy

In consideration for the many music lovers who come to the Roxy and enjoy particulary the music of our orchestra and the other stage presentations, it is respectfully suggested that any unnecessary conversation be eliminated during the performance.

For Coming Attraction See Next Page
Program Subject to Change Without Notice

Ciro's "Doux Jasmin" is provided for the use of patrons in the Ladies' Lounges with the complements of the house.

The STEINWAY is the official piano of the Roxy Theatre
The LYON and HEALY HARP is used in the Roxy Symphony Orchestar
Percussion Instrucments in the Roxy Orchestra from LANDAY BROS.
Scenery designed by CLARK ROBINSON executed by JOSEPH TEICHNER Studios
Wigs by SHINDHELM  Rugs by CASTELLI BROS.  Toe Shoes by LA MENDOLA
Costumes by HARRIET ROGGE, Inc., and EAVES COSTUME CO.


Roxy Theatre program

COMING!

THE SENSATIONAL FOX MOVIETONE DRAMA
"GOOD INTENTIONS"
with
Edmund Lowe     Marguerite Churchill
REGIS TOOMEY     OWEN DAVIS, Jr.

Directed by William K. Howard

And a brilliant Roxy Stage Show

ROXY AND HIS GANG

broadcast from the theatre studio every Sunday, from 2 to 3 p.m. and every Monday from 7:45 to 8:30 p.m., by courtesy of the National Broadcasting Company, through WJZ, New York; WBZA, Boston, Mass.; WBZ, Springfield, Mass.; WBAL, Baltimore, Md.; KDKA, Pittsburgh, Pa.; WLW, Cincinnati, O.; KYW, Chicago, Ill.; WRC, Washington, D.C.; WFAA, Dallas, Texas; WEBC, Duluth, Minn. and Superior, Wisc; KFAB, Lincoln, Neb.; CKGW, Toronto, Canada; WHAS, Louisville, Ky; KSTP, Saint Paul, Minn.; KWK, St. Louis, Mo.; WTMJ, Milwaukee; WREN, Kansas City, Mo.; WSB, Atlanta, Ga.; WRVA, Richmond, Va.; WJAX, Jacksonville, Fla.; WHAM, Rochester, N.Y.; WSM, Nashville, Tenn.; WPTF, Raleigh, N. C.; WJDX, Jackson, Miss.; WCKY, Covington Ky.; KGO, San Francisco. Cal.;WIBO, Chicago, Ill.; KOA, Denver, Col.; WFLA, Clearwater, Fla.; WSUN, St. Petersburg, Fla.

The Roxy Theatre
S. L. ROTHAFEL - President and Director General

Music

JOSEPH LITTAU

Director of Music

Maurice Baron

Conductor

Mischa Violin

Conductor

Max Herzberg

Master of Chorus

Lew White

Chief Organist

Leo Russotto

Vocal Coach

Jules Cocozza

Orchestra Personnel Mgr.

Edwin Zimmermann

Music Librarian

Administration Staff

Arthur A Jones

Comptroller

Jacques J. Benjamin

Ass't to Mr. Rothafel

Bernard P. Arons

Ass't to Mr. Rothafel

Leah Klar

Ass't to Mr. Rothafel

House Staff

Charles W. Griswold

Manager

Kirk McGee

Ass't Manager

Charles F. Dowe

Ass't Manager

A. A. Levy

House Treasurer

William Smith

Chief Engineer

H. E. Hiller

Communications Engineer

Anne Beckerie

Nurse

Mabel Bryde

Nurse

Production

LEON LEONIDOFF

Production Assistant to Mr. Rothafel

CLARK ROBINSON

Art Director

Douglas B. Murray

Production Manager

Florence Rogge

Ballet Mistress

Leonide Massine

Ballet Master

James Morcom

Ass't Art Director

Marco Montedoro

Costume Designer

Eugene Braun

Electrical Supervisor

Production Staff

Norman M. Schwartz

Ass't Prod. Mgr.

Frank Schmeider

Electrical Director

Arthur Smith

Chief Projectionist

P. J. McCarthy

Ass't Stage Director

Edward Roelker

Mechanical Director

Thomas Sullivan

Chief or Properties

Publicity and Advertising

Martha L. Wilchinski

Director

Albert Margolies

Assistant

A REQUEST

We, the attaches of the Roxy Theatre, earnestly request our patrons to kindly refrain from offering gratuities for any services rendered. We have pledged Mr. S. L. Rothafel, "Roxy" that we will under no circumstances accept payment from his patrons for courtesies we enjoy extending to them. The offering of a gratuity will be mutually embarrassing because it will be politely be refused.

THE ATTACHES -- William J. Reilly (Chief Usher)


Roxy Theatre program

Roxy Theatre

EXIT DIAGRAMS

FIRE NOTICE -- Look around NOW and choose the nearest Exit to your seat. In case of fire, walk (not run) to THAT exit. Do not try to beat your neighbor to the street.

JOHN J. DORMAN (Fire Commissioner)


More Information on the Roxy Theatre...

The Roxy Theatre at CinemaTreasures.com


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Last Modified May 4, 2011