The Tree of Knowledge (1920)

THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE press book

EXHIBITOR'S PRESS BOOK

Jesse L. Lasky presents
ROBERT WARWICK
in
"THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE"
A Paramount Artcraft Picture
with Wanda Hawley, Kathlyn Williams, Irving Cummings, Theodore Kosloff, Tom Forman
A Tale of Life's Forbidden Fruit

From the play by R.C. Carton
Directed by William C. DeMille
Scenario by Margaret Turnbull

EXHIBITORS: Above is a four-column press ad, which is one of the many exploitation aids suggested in this Press Book to help you put over "The Tree of Knowledge." The little cut on the left is for supplementary use, and you will find other one, two and three-column ads on page 4.  Mats free at your Exchange.  Electros at cost of manufacture.

THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE press book

Paramount Artcraft Pictures

Production Cuts, Actual Size and Screen, Just as they will Appear in Your Newspapers

How to Order These Cuts

Tell your Famous Players-Lasky Exchange that you want production cuts No. . . . . (indicating numbers of illustrations on this page which you desire).  Give name of production and number of page of press book on which illustrated.  Your exchange also has 10 stock cuts of illustrated.  Your exchange also has 10 stock cuts of Robert Warwick which are good for any of his productions.

Be sure to say whether you wish mats or electros.

9581: ROBERT WARWICK and KATHLYN WILLIAMS in a scene from "THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE" A PARAMOUNT  ARTCRAFT PICTURE

9582: ROBERT WARWICK and WANDA HAWLEY in a scene from "THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE"  A PARAMOUNT ARTCRAFT PICTURE

9584: ROBERT WARWICK in "THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE" A PARAMOUNT ARTCRAFT PICTURE

9583: ROBERT WARWICK and KATHLYN WILLIAMS in a scene from "THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE" A PARAMOUNT ARTCRAFT PICTURE

9580: ROBERT WARWICK in "THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE" A PARAMONT ARTCRAFT PICTURE

THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE press book

Paramount Artcraft Pictures

EXHIBITOR'S PRESS BOOK

Charles Kenmore Ulrich, Editor

PRESS STORIES   AD CUTS AND MATS

Valuable Selling Points for Exhibitors in Exploiting Robert Warwick's Latest Paramount Artcraft Photoplay, "The Tree of Knowledge"

VIRILE, red-blooded screen stars in strong, dramatic stories are about the best possible box-office combination that can be offered an exhibitor.  Every picture featuring Robert Warwick since his return from military service in France has been adapted from a recognized success.  "Secret Service" had thrilled thousands before Mr. Warwick scored so emphatically in it.  "Told in the Hills", his second winner, was based upon one of the most successful novels of the past quarter-century.  Augustus Thomas' famous play, "In Mizzoura", and Anthony Hope's "An Adventure in Hearts" maintained the same high standard.  If prestige, based upon sheer merit, indicates anything, we predict large audiences will welcome the latest Warwick photoplay, "The Tree of Knowledge".  It is from a famous English play.  A glance at the cast will convince you that it is out of the ordinary.  William C. De Mille was the director.  The picture has the earmarks of a winner.

Robert Warwick, Virile Star

THE eagerness of the motion picture producers -- practically every one of the big ones -- tosecure the services of Major Robert Warwick, when he was discharged from the army after distinguished service over-seas shows how highly his talents are regarded in those quarters.  The reason is not hard to find.  Mr. Warwick established his reputation as an actor when he appeared in stage plays opposite soem of the leading feminine stars.  Later entering motion pictures under the direction of William A. Brady, he repeated his success on the screen.  Just when he was mounting to the front rank of his profession, war was declared with Germany.  Mr. warwick at once showed his whole-hearted patriotism by sacrificing his splendid prospects and enlisting.  He was commissioned a captain at Plattsburg, served seventeen months in France, as was discharged as a major.

That his war experience helped, rather than hindered his development as a film player is attested by the enthusiastic reception that has been given his post-war pictures by critics and public alike.  We believe his work in "The Tree of Knowledge" marks the high-water mark in his screen career to date.

R. C. Carton, Author

The plays of R. C. Carton has for thirty years been favorites on the London stage, and many of them have been produced with striking success in this country.  Mr. Carton, an Englishman, was originally an actor, but retired from the stage a number of years ago to devote his time to playwriting.  "Lord and Lady Algy" is one of his well known works.  "The Tree of Knowledge", produced first at the St. james Theater, London, in 1896 and revived many times since that date, is a powerful, thought-compelling story and especially suitable for reproduction on the screen.

Margaret Turnbull, Scenarist

MARGARET TURNBULL has the distinction of being the authoress of several popular novels and stage successes as well as a scenarist of unusual talent.  Singularly enough, she is the co-author of "Classmates" with William C. De Mille, who directed "The Tree of Knowledge".  Coming to this country from Scotland and engaging in literary work from her early youth, Miss Turnbull began writing originals and adaptations for the screen several years ago, though she but recently became affiliated with the Paramount-Artcraft scenario staff.  "The Tree of Knowledge" shows the results of her long experience and knowledge of motion picture technique.

William C. DeMille, Director

WILLIAM C. DeMILLE has been associated for a long time with his talented brother, Cecil B., in the motion picture business as both writer and director.  Previous to that time, he was a prolific plawright, being the author of such classics of the stage as "Strongheart" and "The Warrens of Virginia".  Lately he has been devoting himself exclusively to the screen, producing several original 'scripts and directing some of the most popular Paramount-Artcraft pictures.  He recently wrote "Why Change Your Wife?", a Cecil B. DeMille production.  His equal facility in the directing end of the game is shown by the masterly manner in which he handled "The Tree of Knowledge".

A Strong, Heart-Appealing Story

The picture opens with a beautiful prologue, depicting in pantomime the ancient story of Adam and his demon-wife Lilith.

In the main section a modern Lilith, named Belle has in her toils a young Englishman, Nigel Stanyon, destined for the Church.  Having ruined his reputation and exhausted his purse, she casts him aside.  He is later discovered by his old friend, Brian, son of Sir Mostyn Hollingsworth, who puts him on his feet and offers him a position as overseer of the Hollingsworth estates.  Nigel accepts.

But his happiness in his new surroundings is abruptly shattered when Brian returns from a trip abroad with Belle as his wife.  Nigel is himself in love with an innocent girl named Monica, but fears to tell her so, owing to his scarlet past.  Belle, who has married Brian for his money, is thunderstruck to find that the Hollingsworths are bankrupt.  She starts an affair with a wealthy bounder named Roupelle and plans to elope with him.  Nigel discovers the news and in an encounter nearly strangles her.  When Brian bursts into the room, Belle denounces Nigel as a jealous former lover.

Brian thereupon orders Nigel from his house.  Soon afterward he has an encounter with Roupelle and administers a terrific beating.  Belle rescues the fallen Roupelle and they flee in an automobile together.  Nigel is quickly cleared and returns to Moncia (sic) and hears from her lips her love and forgiveness.

Guy Wilky, Photographer

THOUGH "The Tree of Knowledge" is the first picture photographed by Guy Wilky for Paramount-Artcraft, he has been connected with motion pictures since the early days of the industry.  Starting with the old Lubin Company, he acted as cameraman for several producers, including Thomas H. Ince.  Mr. Wilky is a special student of artificial lighting and is recoginized as an expert in this line.  Beautiful photography is a feature of the "Tree of Knowledge", especially in the prologue, which is laid in the Garden of Eden.

A Cast of Unusual Merit

Beautiful Kathlyn Williams has the chief woman's part opposite Robert Warwick in this picture.  Her capabilities are well known.  Another beauty of the screen, Wanda Hawley, plays the role of Monica.  Tom Forman, lately returned from the wars, is his usual talented self, and Irving Cummings, one of the screen's best hated "villains", is excellent as the male "heavy".  Others in the company are Winter Hall, Loyola O'Connor, Clarence Geldart, and William Brown.  The celebrated Russian interpretative dancer, Theodore Kosloff, and Yvonne Gardelle take part in the artistic prologue.

The High Spots

HERE is a picture that will certainly create a stir among your patrons.  A vampire-woman ruins a good man.  When he has gotten on his feet again, she suddenly reappears in his life as the wife of his dearest friend.  How's that for a thrilling, dramatic situation to bring them up standing?

And that's only the beginning of "The Tree of Knowledge".

In addition to Robert Warwick, some of the most notable people in filmdom appear in this cast.  Their names mean something to your people.  So does that of William C. Dem Mille, one of the outstanding figures among those who create for the screen.

As an artistic interest-whetter we don't think that you can beat the prologue to this picture.  The ancient fable of Adam and Lilith is interpreted by two of the finest pantomimists in the world of dance.  The background is wonderful.  It's a sensation!

Your main assests, then, are: (1) Robert Warwick, one of the screen's most virile and attractive personalities; (2) "The Tree of knowledge" (sic), a story of the age-old struggle between the tiger-woman and men, both staunch and frail; (d) Directed by William C. DeMille; (4) A Paramount-Artcraft Picture; (5) A strong supporting cast, including Wanda Hawley, Kathlyn Williams, Tom forman, and Irving Cummings.

THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE press book

A Paramount Artcraft Picture
One, Two and Three-Column Advertisements, Furnished as Electro and Mat

 

Jesse L. Lasky Presents Robert Warwick in "The Tree of Knowledge" A Paramount-Artcraft Picture.
From the Play by R.C. Carton  Directed by William C. DeMille  Scenario by Margaret Turnbull

The Bitter Fruit!

SHE had toyed with him -- wrecked his life.  Now she was waiting to signal her latest dupe to come and take her away.  Maddened -- his hands were closing on her throat -- when her husband, his dearest friend, walked into the room!

A story of tares in the Garden of Love, with Wanda Hawley, Kathlyn Williams, Tom Forman, Theodore Kosloff, Irving Cummings

 

Jesse L. Lasky presents ROBERT WARWICK
in "The Tree of Knowledge" A Paramount-Artcraft Picture
From the story by R. C. Carton  Directed by Wm. C. DeMille  Scenario by Marg. Turnbull

HE had turned from the path of duty to eat the forbidden fruit.  Then, when the GREAT love came, his false friend said: "Women, good or bad -- where they love much, forgive much."  Was he right?  See the answer in this great picture.

with Wanda Hawley, Kathlyn Williams, Theodore Kosloff, Tom Forman, Irving Cummings

THEATRE

 

A Paramount Artcraft Picture
Jesse L. Lasky presents ROBERT WARWICK in "The Tree of Knowledge"

An old legend says that the tempter in Eden was not a serpent, but a beautiful women, Lillith, the demon wife of Adam before Eve was created.

These two had tasted of life's forbidden fruit -- and he alone had paid.  Now she had come to poison the one pure love he had known.

A great picture with a great cast.  See it!

From the play by R. C. Carton   Directed by William C. DeMille   Scenario by Margaret Turnbull

 

Paramount Artcraft Pictures

Cast and Story of "THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE"

For Use of exhibitors in Their House Programs or for General Publicity in the exploitation of the Major Marwick's Latest Photoplay.

A Paramount Artcraft Picture

Robert Warwick Learns that "Whan a Woman Loves Much, She Forgives Much" as Hero of Stirring Paramount Artcraft Picture, "The Tree of Knowledge"

"The Tree of Knowledge"
The Cast

In the prologue:

Adam

Theodore Kosloff

Lilith

Yvonne Gardelle

In the Story:

Nigel Stanyon

Robert Warwick

Belle

Kathlyn Williams

Monica

Wanda Hawley

Brian

Tom Forman

Sir Mostyn Hollingsworth

Winter Hall

Loftus Roupelle

Irving Cummings

Mrs. Stanyon

Loyola O'Connor

The Baron

Clarence Geldart

Sweadle, a Poacher

William Brown

THE story is introduced by a prologue, telling the ancent (sic) legend of Lilith, the demon-wife of Adam, before eve was was (sic) created, who tempted the man as later did the serpent the women.  This leads to the real story in which Belle, one of the daughters of Lilith, whose call to the sons of men still rings, has young Nigel Stanyon, an Englishman destined by his mother for the church, in her toils.

Nigel, after completing his studies at Cambridge, accepts a traveling tutorship and whil on the continent meets Belle who enlists his sympathy by her false story of loss of money, this his love.  He proposts marriage, but she refuses, saying that their love is beyond the need of conventional ties.  He is shocked, but nevertheless he falls and when his money goes, Belle elopes with a certain Baron who has paid her marked attention.

Fearing to return home to face his mother and friends, Nigel become a waiter.  He is found by Brian, the only sone of Sir Mostyn Hollingsworth, who long has desired that Nigel should become the manager of his estate.  Nigel consents, returns home, but tells no one of his escapade with Belle.  He renew his friendship with Monica, a beautiful girl, and falls in love with her.  Because of Belle, he cannot speak his love to Monica without confessing the sin of which he is guilty.

Nigel is happy with his new employment, but when his mother urges him to marry Monica, his troubles begin.  He tells the story of his affair with Belle to Loftus Roupelle, a wealthy sport, who advies him to forget the matter and to espouse Monica on the theory that when a woman loves much, she forgives much.  Nigel is about to take advantage of this advice when Brian returns from abroad and informs him that he has secretly married and that his wife is awaiting him in a motor car outside.  He begs Nigel to speak to his father and thereby lessen the shock that muct be his when he learns of Brian's marriage.  He promises to do this and Brian brings in his wife, who proves to be Belle.

Nigel's position becomes tremendously difficult.  He asks leave to resign his job but Sir Mostyn protests.  The latter is informed of Brian's marriage and, after forgiving the youth, announces that he is a bankrupt (sic), unless he can borrow $100,000 immediately.  Belle is thunderstruck at this for she realizes that she has made, to her, the supreme sacrifice of marrying for money only to discover that there is none.

Roupelle makes advances to belle who does not repel them.  Brian is unhappy and when he accompanies his father to the city to raise the money needed to save the estate, Belle plans to elope with Roupelle.  They are overheard by Swaedle, a poacher, who informs Nigel.  The latter seeks Belle and urges her to forego the elopement.  She insults him and goaded to madness he attempts to strangle her.  Brian enters and cannot understand until Belle denounces Nigel as a former sweetheart of hers.  Brian thrusts him forth and tells him to go before he kills both Belle and himself.

Nigel leaves and Brian falls to the floor exhausted.  Belle gives him a sleeping potion, and hastens to keep her appointment with Roupelle, who is to meet her on a prearranged signal. Nigel meets Roupelle and in a fight that ensues, knocks the latter down, leaving him stunned.  He notifies Roupelle's chauffeur to take him away and returns home.  He meets Monica and telling her to leave him, says that he is not fit to speak to her.  Belle reaches the automobile just as the chauffeur is dragging Roupelle into the vehicle and leaving her cloak behine her, she gets into the car and passes out of the story.

Believing that Belle is still with Brian, Nigel prepares to leave the country.  Monica, believing that Nigel's perturbation is due to distress because of Brian's financial condition, offers her fortune to the latter.  The truth is finally revealed to Monica by Brian and the latter sends Nigel to Monica in the garden where he is destined learn that when a woman loves much, she forgives much.

Send these Press Reviews of "The Tree of Knowledge" to Your Newspapers

THOUGH Robert Warwick is the star of the new picture at the ........ Theatre this week, the predominating note is the "eternal feminine".  The title is "The Tree of Knowledge", and as might be inferred, it harks back to the Garden of Eden for its motif.  However, the story is thoroughly modern, the connection with Eve and Original Sin being established by a beautiful prologue.

In this, Theodore Kosloff, the Russian interpretative dancer, and Yvonne Gardelle are partners in a fine bit of pantomime, portraying the ancient fable of Adam and his demon-wife Lilith, who is supposed mythically to have been Eve's predecessor.

The main action concerns one Nigel Stanyon, a youth destined for the Church, who, while traveling on the continent, is lured by a female adventuress named Belle to his ruin.  After exhausting his purse, she cases him aside.  Passing through some distressing vicissitudes, Nigel finally is installed in England as overseer on the estate of his old friend, Brian, son of a nobleman.  He come to love an innocent girl, Monica, but fears to tell her so, owing to his scarlet past.  His position become sdoubly difficult when Brian returns with the brazen Belle as his wife.  What follows is full of dramatic action, of which is is sufficient to say tha Belle finally disappears with a third charmer and Brian summons his courage to win Monica's love and forgiveness.

The cast includes such notable players as Wanda Hawley, Kathlyn Williams, Tom Forman, and Irving Cummings.  William C. DeMille directed the picture, which is a Paramount Artcraft.


"The Tree of Knowledge"
A Rhymed Review
By Russell Holman

An Ancient legend tells the tale
Of Lilith, Adam's demon-mate,
Who tempted Man before Eve came
And of the fatal apple ate.

A modern Lilith, hearless fair,
Ensnaring men with serpent-charm,
Until a victim breaks his bonds
To save his dearest friend from harm.

See Robert Warwick, fighting man;
A flaming film of love and strife;
"The Tree of Knowledge" -bitter fruits;
A thrill, a warning straight from life.


MAJOR Robert Warwick, who fought bravely against the Huns during the war, succumbs quite easily to woman's wiles in his new picture, "The Tree of Knowledge", which opened a ........ day's run at the ........ Theatre last evening.

The soldier-star has the role of a young Englishman, studying for the ministry, who falls under the influence of a female adventuress.  After she has deserted him for another, he becomes manager of his best friend's estate.  Later the friend returns from abroad with the woman as his wife.  Some highly dramatic situations follow, but the temptress is finally foiled, and the hero wins his happiness with a girl of quite a different stripe.

A beautiful prologue, suposedly laid in the Garden of Eden, precedes the main action and supplied the motif of the story.  It is quite effective.  Wanda Hawley, Tom forman, Kathlyn Williams, and Irving Cummings are included in the cast supporting Mr. Warwick.  The work of Miss Williams, as "The woman", is especially meritorious.

The picture, which is a Paramount Artcraft, was directed by William C. DeMille.

 

THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE press book

POSTERS! The posters on "The Tree of Knowledge" are exceptionally good.

Look them over for yourself.  Don't they look interesting?

Stick them up around your town and get the crowds.


with Robert Warwick, Wanda Hawley, Kathlyn Williams, and Irving Cummings. Directed by William C. deMille. Paramount.

More Information on this film...

           

Books

None.


free html hit counter

Last Modified May 3, 2009